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UN Migration Agency's International Dialogue on Migration Sets Stage for Global Compact on Migration Consultations

Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:48
Language English

United Nations- The International Organization for Migration’s (IOM) first International Dialogue on Migration (IDM) at the United Nations (UN) Headquarters in New York, since joining the UN last year, took place on 18 and 19 April.

Under the theme Strengthening International Cooperation on and Governance of Migration towards the Adoption of a Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration in 2018, the IDM gathered over 300 representatives of States, civil society and other key actors from all relevant sectors.

Participants discussed recommendations to build coherence within and between the various levels of migration governance, promote cooperation mechanisms on migration, and identify concrete elements for a comprehensive global migration framework.

The two-day workshop was also an opportunity for States and all relevant migration actors to frame the core objectives for the global compact, and ground it in the existing normative structures and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

“The Global Compact presents an historical opportunity to achieve a world in which migrants move as a matter of genuine choice rather than necessity; a world of opportunity to migrate through safe, orderly and regular channels; and a world in which migration is well governed and is able to act as a positive force for individuals, societies and States,” said IOM Director General William Lacy Swing in his opening remarks.

Ambassador Swing added that “IOM envisions a global compact, therefore, that will place the needs, capacities and contributions of migrants at its core, with a view to ensuring their safety, dignity and human rights”.

Joining Ambassador Swing at the opening session was Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on International Migration (SRSG), who highlighted that the international community now has “important responsibility to deliver on safe, orderly and regular migration in a manner that is principled and practicable, designed to improve the lives of millions of people on the move, of those they leave behind, and of those who will receive them throughout and at the end of their journey.”

“It is up to all of us to embrace human mobility, and recognize that good migration governance requires a commitment to genuine cooperation. People in transit and destination countries should not be made to look at migrants as burdens, or even worse as threats to themselves or their way of life,” Arbour said in her opening remarks.

The two-day workshop was divided into 6 panels which featured high-level representatives of States and civil society.

“We need to recognize the significant contributions of many of the migrants who move regularly, filling labour force gaps; building the economy and creating jobs through their entrepreneurship; adding young people to countries with low birth rates; and sharing their cultures with those in the countries of adoption,” stressed Ahmed Hussen, Canada’s Minister for Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship.

“The strategy that we foresaw is a comprehensive one: it takes into account the emerging attitude of public opinion, linked to the sense of insecurity of our citizens, and called for a better border management. It also takes into account the necessity of changing the narrative about migration, valuing its positive aspects and valuing the contribution of migrants to a diverse and thriving society,” said Luigi Maria Vignalli, Principal Director for Migration Policies at Italy’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Msgr. Robert J. Vitillo, Secretary General of the International Catholic Migration Commission, advocated for an ‘SDG-like approach’. “Two years could be allocated for the goals and targets most urgent and immediately achievable, including more systematic implementation of best interest determinations for children, reform of migrant worker recruitment practices, alternatives to detention, and orderly departure programmes. Five years for goals more difficult to be achieved, such as return and reintegration; and 15 years for full achievement,” said Msgr. Vitillo.

Amina Mohamed, Deputy Secretary General of the United Nations in her closing remarks noted, “The global compact should therefore be framed in a way that is consistent with, and supportive of the migration elements of the 2030 Agenda. In practice, this is going to mean that one of the objectives of the Global Compact should be to provide us with a practical roadmap on how to achieve target 10.7.”

Participants also widely welcomed IOM’s central role and expertise in the global compact process. In his closing remarks, Peter Thomson, President of the 71st General Assembly, noted that IOM’s support to the intergovernmental process will continue to be vital as the process evolves, particularly in extending to Member States the required technical and policy expertise. He also acknowledged the ongoing close collaboration between IOM, the Office of the PGA, and the office of SRSG.

IOM’s vision for a Global Compact encompasses four core elements: protecting the rights of migrants; facilitating safe, orderly and regular migration; reducing the incidence and impacts of forced and irregular migration; and addressing mobility consequences of natural and human-induced disasters.

The outcomes from the first IDM and the second one scheduled for 18-19 July in Geneva, will feed into the consultation phase of the Global Compact on Migration which will culminate in the stocktaking preparatory meeting in Mexico in December.

For further information on the agenda and meeting documents, please check the International Dialogue on Migration webpage: https://www.iom.int/idm-2017-global-compact-migration

Or contact Azzouz Samri, Governing Bodies Division, at Tel: +41 22 717 9468, Email: asamri@iom.int

Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 - 17:28Image: Region-Country: AmericaUnited States of AmericaThemes: IOM Governing BodiesDefault: 

Arrivées de migrants en Europe par la Méditerranée : 43 000 ; décès en mer : 962

Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:48
Language English

Switzerland - D’après l’OIM, au 19 avril 2017, 42 974 migrants et réfugiés sont arrivés en Europe par la mer. Plus de 80 pourcent sont arrivés en Italie et le reste en Grèce et en Espagne. Au 19 avril 2016, ils étaient 205 613.

ÉVOLUTION DE LA SITUATION DANS LA MÉDITÉRRANÉE

NOMBRE TOTAL D’ARRIVÉES ET DE DÉCÈS EN MER 2016-2017

1er JANVIER – 19 AVRIL 2017 1er  JANVIER – 19 AVRIL 2016

Pays d’arrivée

Arrivées

Décès

Arrivées

Décès

Italie

37 703

898 (Itinéraire méd. centrale)

25 353

853 (Itinéraire méd. centrale)

Grèce

4 761

14 (Itinéraire méd. orientale)

179 585

376 (Itinéraire méd. orientale)

Chypre

n.a.

27

Espagne

1 510

50 (Itinéraire méd. occidentale)

648

34 (Itinéraire méd. Occidentale)

Total estimé

42 974

962

205 613

1 263

Flavio Di Giacomo, porte-parole de l’OIM à Rome, a déclaré jeudi 20 avril que plus de 8 360 migrants ont été secourus et amenés en Italie depuis les opérations de secours qui ont eu lieu en haute mer entre vendredi 14 et dimanche et 16 avril. Il a signalé que les migrants voyageaient à bord de 55 embarcations pneumatiques différentes, transportant chacune entre 110 et 150 personnes, ainsi que de trois bateaux en bois transportant respectivement 200, 250 et 500 personnes.

M. Di Giacomo fait remarquer que les 36 703 migrants arrivés en Italie par la mer jusqu’ici cette année dépasse de plus de 10 000 le nombre d’arrivées à la même date de chacune des deux dernières années (voir tableau ci-dessous).

                                                     

Le Ministère italien de l’intérieur a publié des chiffres sur les nationalités des migrants arrivés à ce jour en 2017, rapportant que la Guinée (Conakry), le Nigéria, le Bangladesh, la Côte-d’Ivoire et la Gambie ont chacun envoyé au moins 2 000 migrants pendant les trois premiers mois de l’année en cours. Les statistiques sont frappantes dans le cas du Bangladesh, qui avait enregistré seulement une arrivée par la mer depuis l’Afrique pendant les trois premiers mois de 2016, contre 2 831 cette année.

Le nombre d’arrivées depuis la Guinée, la Côte-d’Ivoire et le Maroc est également monté en flèche par rapport à la même période l’année dernière. Le nombre d’arrivées depuis la Somalie a lui fortement diminué pendant le premier trimestre 2016 (voir tableau ci-dessous). 

 

Christine Petré, de l’OIM en Libye, a déclaré que des pêcheurs libyens ont découvert, mardi, les corps de 28 migrants à bord d’un bateau au large des côtes de Subratah, selon la Direction libyenne de lutte contre la migration illégale (DCIM). Elle a ajouté qu’à ce jour, 4 219 migrants ont été secourus au large des côtes libyennes cette année, et 205 corps ont été repêchés.

A travers le monde, le projet sur les migrants disparus fait état de 1 486 décès au 19 avril (voir tableau ci-dessous). La région méditerranéenne représente la plus grande proportion de décès, soit plus de la moitié du total. C’est 734 décès de moins qu’à la même date en 2016. Toutefois, ces informations n’incluent pas toutes les données de l’Afrique du Nord et de la corne de l’Afrique, deux couloirs de migration où la collecte de données a tendance à être plus lente que dans d’autres régions.

Depuis lundi, le Projet sur les migrants disparus a ajouté la dernière noyade en date (mercredi 19 avril) recensée le long du Rio Bravo qui sépare le Mexique du Texas. L’OIM a recensé 26 noyades le long de la frontière entre le Texas et le Mexique jusqu’ici en 2017, contre seulement neuf à la même date l’année dernière. Pour toute l’année 2016, le Projet sur les migrants disparus avaient enregistré 61 noyades de migrants dans le fleuve séparant le Texas du Mexique. Les 26 noyades de cette année représentent trois fois celles de 2016 à la même date et près de la moitié du total des noyades de l’année dernière.

Tableau comparatif du nombre total de décès 1er janvier – 6 avril 2016 vs. 2017

Région

2017

2016

Méditerranée

962

1 263

Europe

15

19

Moyen-Orient

14

43

Afrique du Nord

198

593

Corne de l’Afrique

65

91

Afrique subsaharienne

12

25

Asie du Sud-Est

45

35

Asie de l’Est

0

0

Etats-Unis/Mexique

74

67

Amérique centrale

20

35

Caraïbes

81

39

Amérique du Sud

0

10

Total

1 486

2 220

Dernière infographie mise à jour dans la Méditerranée :
http://migration.iom.int/docs/MMP/170421_Mediterranean_Update.pdf

Pour consulter les dernières données sur les arrivées et les décès de migrants en Méditerranée, veuillez vous rendre sur : http://migration.iom.int/europe
Pour en savoir plus sur le Projet sur les migrants disparus : http://missingmigrants.iom.int

Pour plus d’informations, veuillez contacter :
Joel Millman, OIM Genève, Tel: +41.79.103-8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, OIM Italie, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Sabine Schneider, OIM Allemagne, Tel. +49 30 278 778 17  Email: sschneider@iom.int
Saba Malme, OIM Yémen à Sana’a, Tel. + 967 736 800 329 (mobile),Email: smalme@iom.int
Daniel Esdras, OIM Grèce Tel: +30 210 9912174, Email: iomathens@iom.int ou Kelly Namia, Tel: +30 210 9919040, +30 210 9912174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black, OIM GMDAC à Berlin, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Mazen Aboulhosn, OIM Turquie, Tel: +9031245-51202, Email: aboulhosn@iom.int ou Abby Dwommoh, Tel Direct: +90 (0)312 454 3048 | Mobile: +90 (533) 698 7285,
Othman Belbeisi, OIM Libye, Email : obelbeisi@iom.int ou Christine Petré, Tel. (Direct):  +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int ou Ashraf Hassan, Tel +216 29 794707, Email: ashassan@iom.int
Alberto Preato, OIM Niger, responsable du Programme MRRM, Tel: +227 8053 5933, E-mail: apreato@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui, OIM Maroc, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int

Pour plus d’informations ou des demandes d’interview en français :
Florence Kim, OIM Genève, Tel: +41 79 103 03 42, Email: fkim@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, OIM Italie, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int

Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 - 17:27Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaSwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: 

IOM, EU Aid Victims of Human Trafficking through New Online Platform

Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:48
Language English

France - IOM, with support from the European Union (EU), has launched an online platform featuring a transnational referral tool designed to strengthen professional response to the needs of victims of human trafficking.

The tool, known as a Transnational Referral Mechanism (TRM) model, links up experts and professionals from different countries involved in the identification, referral, assistance, return, and monitoring of assistance to victims of trafficking. It defines the roles of each stakeholder participating in national referral mechanisms (NRM) and serves as a platform to inform and connect counter-trafficking practitioners in countries of origin and countries of destination.

The model is an output of the EU-funded Transnational Action (TACT) project as part of the EU Strategy towards the Eradication of Trafficking in Human Beings, which ran from 2012 to 2016.

Myria Vassiliadou, the EU’s Anti-Trafficking Coordinator, touted the TRM’s role in linking up national referral mechanisms to better identify, refer, protect and assist victims, and noted its importance through consistent recognition and funding.

“While the EU Anti-Trafficking Strategy has come to an end, the European Commission will continue working towards the early identification of victims and this platform contributes to ensuring victims’ access to rights throughout the process, and especially in a situation of cross-border referral,” she said.

The TACT TRM also outlines internationally compliant procedures to ensure the protection of the victims’ human rights through every step of the assistance process.

It is focused in particular on safe and sustainable return and reintegration for victims of trafficking returning from France, Greece, Italy, Poland and Spain to priority countries such as Albania, Morocco and Ukraine.  

“The TACT TRM platform is a unique tool for gathering a variety of resources, providing professionals with standards and hands-on guidelines on direct assistance to victims of trafficking,” said Fanny Ruinart, IOM’s TACT project manager.

“Its tools, established best practices and experience can be duplicated for the benefit of any interested practitioner in another country and/or regional context,” she added.  

The platform contains four key elements:

  • Standard Operating Procedures for the Safe Return and Reintegration of victims of trafficking;
  • The Counter-Trafficking Directory dedicated to consular and diplomatic staff, currently containing profiles of the status of trafficking of 50 countries;
  • A resources database, hosting over 60 documents covering broad range of thematic areas;
  • A tools application, which contains eight practical tools for practitioners.

For further information, please contact Fanny Ruinart, IOM Paris. Tel: +33 1 40 44 06 91, Email: fruinart@iom.int

Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 - 17:26Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaFranceThemes: Counter-TraffickingDefault: 

Uganda Opens Training Academy for Immigration Officials

Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:48
Language English

Uganda - IOM has formally handed over a facility for training immigration officers, to the Government of Uganda. The Immigration Training Academy in the central district of Nakasongola was built by IOM, as part of the USD 1.8 million project, Strengthening Border Security in Uganda, funded by the Government of Japan.

Speaking at the inauguration ceremony earlier this month, the Prime Minister of Uganda, Dr. Ruhakana Rugunda, said: “The establishment of the Academy is a timely addition to government efforts to combat transnational crimes, which include terrorism, human trafficking and irregular migration.”

After cutting the ribbon and signing the visitors’ book, Dr. Rugunda toured the facility. He was accompanied by the State Minister of Internal Affairs, Obiga Mario Kania; the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Internal Affairs, Dr. Benon Mutambi; the UN Resident Coordinator, Rosa Malango; the Japanese Ambassador to Uganda, Kazuaki Kameda; the IOM Uganda Chief of Mission, Ali Abdi, and other senior officials from the central and local governments.

The Academy will cater for the training needs of the Directorate of Citizenship and Immigration Control (DCIC) of Uganda and possibly other government institutions. Moreover, the Government of Uganda intends to invite other countries in the region to train at this facility particularly on issues of immigration and border control.

With a residential capacity of 50 trainees, the solar-powered facility sits on three acres of land which will allow trainings that require an extended outdoor space, such as border patrolling. The Academy was designed to allow for future expansion that would ensure that it can host up to 300 trainees. Presently it comprises an administration block, training hall, two dormitories, a kitchen shed, staff quarters, as well as three latrine blocks and boreholes. The hall includes a training room specifically for the Migration Information and Data Analysis System (MIDAS). MIDAS is an electronic traveller registration system developed by IOM and is currently operational in eight border crossing points in Uganda.

Abdi told guests: “Comprehensive and continuous training is necessary to ensure that immigration officials can carry out their duties in accordance with international standards. We are confident that this Academy will help DCIC achieve this goal.”

The UN Resident Coordinator, Rosa Malango, highlighted that this Academy and IOM’s work in Uganda contributes to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). To achieve reduced inequality (SDG 10), it is necessary to facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies.

For his part, Ambassador Kameda placed the training academy in the context of the Nairobi Declaration adopted at the Sixth Tokyo International Conference on African Development which took place in the Kenyan capital in August 2016. He said the Academy would help boost the Government’s capacity to tackle radicalization, terrorism and armed conflict, three of the challenges identified in the Nairobi Declaration.

For further information please contact Richard Mulindwa Kavuma, IOM Uganda. Tel: +256 312 263 210. Email: rmkavuma@iom.int

Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 - 17:25Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastUgandaThemes: Capacity BuildingIntegrated Border ManagementDefault: 

IOM Rehabilitates School, Constructs Biggest Cattle Market in Darfur

Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:48
Language English

Sudan - To support communities in East Darfur State, IOM, with support from the European Union, has rehabilitated Al-Sadaga Primary Girls’ School in the Abu Karinka locality and constructed and rehabilitated the Abu Matarig Cattle Market in the Bahr El Arab locality (bordering South Sudan).

These interventions seek to foster relationships among communities by improving access to education and facilitating cross-border trade and commerce to help revitalize economic activity and prevent conflict.

Attending the opening ceremonies on 12 and 13 April 2017 of the Abu Matarig Market and the Al Sadaga Primary Girls’ School were state and local authorities including the Humanitarian Aid Commission, the Ministry of Finance, and Project Community Improvement Committees as well as pastoral and sedentary community members.

The Director General of the State Ministry of Finance, (a national government counterpart of the project), Mohamed Ibrahim, said at the Abu Matarig Market opening ceremony, “This is the biggest market in Darfur, we should work on conserving and maintaining it. Through conserving the environment, we conserve our resources. So many traders from many tribes come here which is a proof of the social coexistence concept existing in this locality, and a main driver towards economic development.”

The construction and rehabilitation of the Abu Mararig Market includes new offices, police check points, latrines and fencing which were all built by IOM with the in-kind contribution from the State Ministry of Finance, particularly in extending the fences surrounding the market area.

In Abu Karinka, the students of Al Sadaga Primary Girls’ School planted trees in the school yard instilling ownership and giving an environmental conservation aspect to their school. A charter, quoting a local peace-promoting proverb, was also signed and hung on the school walls using local material, serving as an informal agreement that upholds the students, teachers and committees to social cohesion and peaceful coexistence.

These interventions are part of the Cross-Border Peace and Cooperation (CBPC) programme funded by the European Union. The project, valued at 2 million Euros and with a duration of 24 months, aims to contribute to Sudan’s development priorities by promoting a conducive environment for community stabilization and peaceful coexistence amongst communities in South and East Darfur States, in areas bordering South Sudan. Pastoralist and sedentary communities have long coexisted in these areas, in an interdependent relationship traditionally facilitated by trade and commerce.

For further information, please contact Dalia El Roubi, IOM Sudan, Tel. (Mobile): +249 9121 54652, Email: delroubi@iom.int

Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 - 17:24Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastSudanThemes: Community StabilizationDefault: 

First Human Rights Trainings Held Inside Libyan Detention Centres Since 2014

Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:48
Language English

Libya - IOM is currently providing human rights training sessions in five Libyan detention centres, the first such trainings since 2014.

In this pilot project, IOM is targeting five centres (Abu Salim, Tariq al Sekka, Al Khums, Gharyan Alhamra and Triq Al Matar) to enhance the capacity of the staff and help improve the living conditions of the migrants.

The first two of the five trainings, inside Tripoli’s Tariq Al Sekka and Abu Salim detention centres, on 14 April and 18 April respectively, focused on the promotion and protection of the human rights of migrants inside the detention centres and was delivered to 24 of the Abu Salim management and 28 of Tariq Al Sekka personnel. The trainings were conducted by the management of the centres, after having attended an intensive five-day course in Tunis in February 2017, with the assistance of IOM staff.

“It is a great step to be able to restart the trainings inside detention centres in Libya,” explained Programme Manager Maysa Khalil.

Some of the topics that were discussed included identification of vulnerable cases, the needs of the migrants, protection and prevention of diseases, and smuggling and human trafficking.

“It is important to build a good relationship with the migrants who are residing in the centres for them to feel safe,” said Mohamed Salem, one of the participants from Tariq Al Sekka following the training sessions. For him the training increased the understanding of the migrants’ needs and their vulnerabilities.

Challenges identified during the session involved communication difficulties due to language barriers and the struggle of handling health cases, such as providing ambulances for urgent cases, and of coordination with clinics for patients such as pregnant women, and those with psychological and mental problems.

“The attendees were excited to participate and tried to give solutions and share suggestions to facilitate the stay of migrants inside the centres by, for example, having a space for children to have fun and play away from their rooms for most of the day,” explained IOM’s Moad Ayad who believes, that the training will have an impact when it comes to the treatment of migrants in detention.

Other issues that were raised were the importance of separating minors and women from other detainees, as well as the right of all migrants to practice their religion freely.

“Even though IOM advocates for the release of detained migrants, this type of human rights trainings aims at long-term improvement of the living conditions for migrants currently inside detention centres,” added Khalil.

The trainings are part of a wider IOM intervention which is focusing on building the capacity of detention centre authorities to ensure that migrants are treated in a way that upholds their dignity and fully respects their human rights.

“The hope is to be able to provide as many detention centre personnel with the training as possible,” added Khalil.

This pilot is part of project, Support and Provide Assistance to Authorities and Migrants in Detention Centres and Contribute to Addressing the Migration Flow through Voluntary Repatriation in Libya, funded by the Government of the United Kingdom.

Under the same project, four detention centres were rehabilitated to meet the basic needs of migrants, particularly when it relates to water and sanitation facilities.

For further information, please contact IOM Libya. Othman Belbeisi, Tel: +216 29 600389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int or Maysa Khalil, Tel: +216 29 600388, Email: mkhalil@iom.int

Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 - 17:23Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastLibyaThemes: Capacity BuildingMigrant AssistanceMigrants RightsDefault: 

IOM Assists 462 Stranded West African Migrants to Return Home from Libya

Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:48
Language English

Libya - On 13 April, IOM helped 156 stranded migrants – 145 men and 11 women – return home to Cote d’Ivoire from Libya. The group included two unaccompanied children, both of them female.

During the same week (18 April), 152 Malians – 14 women and three unaccompanied children — returned home via a charter flight. Of these, 83 had been detained in Tariq Al Sekka detention centre. The following day (19 April), IOM assisted 154 men, women and children in returning to Burkina Faso.

All three return charter flights were part of IOM’s assisted voluntary return and reintegration (AVRR) programme.

The charter flights, which departed from Tripoli’s Mitiga Airport, were coordinated with the Libyan and Ivorian authorities, the Malian Embassy, as well as IOM colleagues in the countries of origin.

IOM performed pre-departure interviews, medical check-ups and facilitated exit visas for all passengers. Prior to departure the migrants also received further assistance.

One of the passengers was Issa*, a 49-year-old from Burkina Faso. He left his four children with their grandmother three years ago and travelled to Libya with his wife to search for work. He started working as a farmer in the coastal city of Az Zawiyah but due to health problems he was not able to continue. After suffering from a stroke, Issa’s arm was paralyzed. He contacted IOM and sought help to return home to his children.

Twenty-year-old Ousmane*, previously an economics student at Bamako University, failed to pay his school fees and was persuaded by a friend in Europe to come there. Unfortunately, Ousmane faced the brutal reality of being kidnapped but managed to pay for his release. He is now relieved to return to Mali.

Sixteen of the most vulnerable cases on the Ivorian flight were considered eligible for reintegration support once back in Cote d’Ivoire. Furthermore, 29 of the most vulnerable Malian migrants and 12 of the migrants from Burkina Faso were also allowed the same assistance. This provided the returnees with an opportunity to start afresh once back home, for example, by opening a small business or continuing with their education.

Another migrant, Drissa* – a 24-year-old Malian – reached Libya six months ago. He crossed the desert linking Mali to Algeria and arrived in Tripoli where he sought work. Drissa, who used to work as painter in Mali, fell off a ladder in Libya and became paralyzed from the waist down. Unable to walk, he was assisted by IOM doctors and returned safely to Mali.

So far in 2017, IOM Libya has helped 2,463 stranded migrants return to their countries of origin. Of these, 508 were eligible for reintegration assistance.

*Migrants’ names have been changed to protect their identities.

For further information, please contact IOM Libya. Othman Belbeisi, Tel: +216 29 600 389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int or Ashraf Hassan, Tel +216 29 794 707, Email: ashassan@iom.int

Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 - 17:22Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastLibyaThemes: Assisted Voluntary Return and ReintegrationMigrant AssistanceDefault: 

IOM Egypt Marks World Health Day with Awareness-raising Sessions on Depression

Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:48
Language English

Egypt - IOM Egypt organized a series of awareness raising sessions on depression from 9–20 April to mark World Health Day (7 April), which this year, had the theme: Depression: let’s talk.

IOM kicked off the sessions with a peer educators’ workshop on 9 April targeting 20 representatives of different migrant communities in Egypt including community health workers and community leaders. IOM physicians moderated the workshop and provided the participants with information on depression, including means of prevention as well as treatment. The participants would then in turn disseminate the knowledge they had gained to their respective migrant communities and guide fellow migrants to the relevant service providers.

Following that workshop, two awareness-raising sessions were carried out on 20 April targeting approximately 250 migrants – invited by the trained peer educators – representing eight migrant communities. The migrants were briefed on depression, its symptoms, and available means of treatment followed by a question and answer session.

“Migrant communities are among those vulnerable populations that are affected by depression and anxiety, mainly as a result of experiencing humanitarian crises, conflict and displacement. Our aim is to reduce the stigma associated with depression and encourage people to talk as a first step towards seeking help,” said Dr. Heidi Goubran, Programme Officer at IOM Egypt’s Migration Health Division.

According to the latest estimates from the World Health Organization, around four percent of the world population lives with depression, an increase of more than 18 per cent in the last decade.

The series of events were organized within the framework of the regional project Promoting Health and Well Being amongst Migrants in Morocco, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen (TRANSIT II) with the generous support of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland.

The project seeks to improve the health and well-being of migrants; support governmental and non-governmental health structures in delivering quality, migrant-friendly and psychosocially aware health-care services; and raise awareness among migrants on available health care (including psychosocial support) and health issues of concern.

For further information, please contact Dr. Heidi Goubran at IOM Egypt, Tel: +20 2273 65140, Email: iomegypt@iom.int

Posted: Friday, April 21, 2017 - 17:21Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastEgyptThemes: Migration HealthDefault: 

IOM’s International Dialogue on Migration Sets Stage for Global Compact on Migration Consultations

Tue, 04/18/2017 - 12:38
Language English

United States - IOM’s two-day (18-19 April) International Dialogue on Migration (IDM) 2017 meeting with the theme, Strengthening International Cooperation on and Governance of Migration towards the Adoption of a Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration in 2018, gets underway at the United Nations in New York later today.

The IDM gathers States and key migration actors from all relevant sectors to exchange views and identify concrete and implementable actions for strengthening international cooperation and migration governance.

It is an opportunity for States and all relevant migration actors to frame the core objectives for the global compact, and ground it in the existing normative structures and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

IOM Director General William Lacy Swing will say in his opening remarks later today, “The Global Compact presents an historical opportunity to achieve a world in which migrants move as a matter of genuine choice rather than necessity; a world of opportunity to migrate through safe, orderly and regular channels; and a world in which migration is well governed and is able to act as a positive force for individuals, societies and States.”

Ambassador Swing will add that “IOM envisions a global compact, therefore, that will place the needs, capacities and contributions of migrants at its core, with a view to ensuring their safety, dignity and human rights.” 

Central to this IOM vision, Ambassador Swing will add, are four core elements: protecting the rights of migrants; facilitating safe, orderly and regular migration; reducing the incidence and impacts of forced and irregular migration; and addressing mobility consequences of natural and human-induced disasters.

In her opening remarks, Louise Arbour, the Secretary General’s Special Representative for International Migration will say, “It is up to all of us to embrace human mobility, and recognize that good migration governance requires a commitment to genuine cooperation. People in transit and destination countries should not be made to look at migrants as burdens, or even worse as threats to themselves or their way of life.”

Ms Arbour will add, “Instead, we need collectively to strengthen the narrative – one which has the virtue of truth – that recognizes human mobility and diversity as a contribution to evolving societies and strong economies.”

The IDM meeting will seek participants’ recommendations on building coherence within and between the various levels of migration governance, promoting cooperation mechanisms on migration, and identifying concrete elements for a comprehensive global framework.

The meeting will hear from and interact with a number of distinguished panelists such as the UN Deputy Secretary General, Amina J. Mohammed, the President of the UN General Assembly Peter Thomson, the Secretary General’s Special Representative for International Migration, Louise Arbour, the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship of Canada, Ahmed Hussen, the two co-facilitators of the modalities of the GCM process, Permanent Representatives of Switzerland and Mexico and many other distinguished representatives of Governments, civil society, academia and the private sector.

The outcomes from this IDM and the second one scheduled for 18-19 July in Geneva, will feed into the consultation phase of the Global Compact on Migration which will culminate in the stocktaking preparatory meeting in Mexico in December. 

For more information on the agenda and meeting documents please check the International Dialogue on Migration webpage https://www.iom.int/idm-2017-global-compact-migration or contact Azzouz Samri, Head of the Governing Bodies Division at Tel: +41227179468, Email: asamri@iom.int  

Posted: Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 18:11Image: Region-Country: AmericaUnited States of AmericaThemes: IOM Governing BodiesInternational and Regional CooperationDefault: 

Mediterranean: Nearly 9,000 Migrants Rescued in One Weekend, as Total Deaths Reach 900 in 2017

Tue, 04/18/2017 - 12:38
Language English

Switzerland - Over the three days between Friday 14 to Sunday 16 April, a total of 8,360 migrants were rescued in the Mediterranean by the Italian Coast Guard, the many Non-governmental Organizations (NGOs) rescue ships, Frontex, EunavforMEd and commercial ships.

The migrants were travelling on 55 rubber dinghies, each carrying between 110 and 150 people, and three big wooden boats, carrying 200, 250 and 500 people respectively. Those rescued were brought to various locations in Italy including: Catania, Messina, Augusta, Pozzallo, Palermo, Porto Empedocle, Lampedusa (Sicily), Reggio Calabria, Vibo Valentia (Calabria) and Cagliari (Sardinia).

A total of approximately 32,800 migrants have been brought to land since the beginning of 2017. The total number of arrivals is predicted to reach about 36,000 in the next two days.

So far this year, at least 900 migrants have died or have gone missing while attempting to cross the Mediterranean according to IOM’s Missing Migrants Project.

Improving weather appears to have motivated smugglers to put as many migrants to sea as possible. The overwhelming majority of the rescues occurred off Libya’s coastline, as migrants are sent to sea in overcrowded dinghies, easily overwhelmed by waves.

Almost 90 per-cent of the 900 migrant deaths in the Mediterranean have been recorded on the Libya-to-Italy route. In one incident on 13 April, 23 people were rescued and 97 are estimated to have gone missing (77 men, 15 women, and 5 children from Africa) off the coast of Gargaresh, near Tripoli, Libya. In another incident off the coast of Qarabulli, Libya, on the night of 14 April, 101 migrants were rescued, and 5 migrants died.

Thirteen other bodies were recovered by NGO rescue operations, including the ships of MOAS, Sea Eye, and Jugend Rettet. Between 1 January and 18 April last year, IOM’s Missing Migrants Project (MMP) recorded 1,263 migrant deaths and disappearances in the Mediterranean. The higher number of deaths at this point in 2016 is largely due to deaths on the Eastern Mediterranean route, in which 376 deaths were recorded between January and 18 April 2016, compared to only 14 so far this year.

By route, the total of missing/dead migrants recorded by IOM’s Missing Migrants Project are:

1 January – 18 April

2017

2016

Western Mediterranean

50

34

Central Mediterranean

849

853

Eastern Mediterranean

14

376

Total

913

1,263

Worldwide, the IOM Missing Migrants Project reports that there 1,421 fatalities through 18 April (see chart, below), with the Mediterranean region accounting for the largest proportion of deaths – over half of the global total. This is just under 1,000 fewer fatalities than were reported at the same point in 2016. However, these data do not account for full reporting from North Africa and the Horn of Africa, two migration corridors where data collection tends to be slower than in other regions.

 

2017

2016

Mediterranean

913

1,263

Europe

15

19

Middle East

13

42

North Africa

198

589

Horn of Africa*

65

91

Sub-Saharan Africa

12

24

Southeast Asia

44

35

East Asia

0

0

US/Mexico

73

67

Central America

20

35

Caribbean

81

39

South America

0

10

Total

1,421

2,214

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe

Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For further information please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM Geneva, Tel: +41.79.103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo at IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Sabine Schneider at IOM Germany, Tel. +49 30 278 778 17 Email: sschneider@iom.int
IOM Yemen, Saba Malme, Sana’a, Tel. + 967 736 800 329 (mobile), Email: smalme@iom.int
IOM Greece: Daniel Esdras, Tel: +30 210 9912174, Email: iomathens@iom.int
or Kelly Namia, Tel: +30 210 9919040, +30 210 9912174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black at IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Abby Dwommoh, IOM Turkey; Tel: + Direct: +90 (0)312 454 3048| Mobile: +90 (533) 698 7285, Email: adwommoh@iom.int, Mazen Aboulhosn at IOM Turkey, Tel: +9031245-51202, Email: maboulhosn@iom.int
IOM Libya: Othman Belbeisi, Tel +216 29 600389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int  or Christine Petré, Tel. (Direct):  +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int or Ashraf Hassan, Tel +216 29 794707, Email: ashassan@iom.int
IOM Niger: Alberto Preato, MRRM Programme Manager, Tel: +227 8053 5933, E-mail: apreato@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui at IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int

For information or interview requests in French:
Florence Kim, OIM Genève, Tel: +41 79 103 03 42, Email: fkim@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, OIM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int

Posted: Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 18:10Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaSwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: